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Kimchi Fried Rice

If you have some kimchi and rice, try this easy kimchi fried rice recipe! It’s so versatile that you can add any protein you like or omit it entirely. It’ll become one of your go-to easy meals.

Kimchi fried rice is a humble Korean dish made basically with kimchi and leftover rice. Since Korean homes almost always have these two staples, kimchi fried rice is a favorite go-to meal whenever there seems to be nothing to eat at home.

t’s especially popular among young people who are living on a low budget as it is a quick-fix meal, inexpensive to prepare, yet delicious and filling.

 

Kimchi Fried Rice 

If you have some kimchi and rice, try this easy kimchi fried rice recipe! It’s so versatile that you can add any protein you like or omit it entirely. It’ll become one of your go-to easy meals. 

 

Kimchi fried rice (kimchi bokkeumbap, 김치볶음밥) is a humble Korean dish made basically with kimchi and leftover rice. Since Korean homes almost always have these two staples, kimchi fried rice is a favorite go-to meal whenever there seems to be nothing to eat at home.

It’s especially popular among young people who are living on a low budget as it is a quick-fix meal, inexpensive to prepare, yet delicious and filling.

All you need is well fermented kimchi and some cooked rice! Kimchi has plenty of flavors, but it’s common to add some gochujang, soy sauce and/or gochugaru for more robust savory flavors and spiciness.

Popular protein additions by Koreans include processed meat, such as bacon, ham, sausage, or spam, as well as canned tuna. You can also cooked or uncooked chicken, pork, beef or shrimp, so feel free to experiment once you’ve got a hang of the basic technique.

For a vegan option, substitute the meat with tofu or omit it. Use vegan kimchi and skip the egg.

 

Rice for Kimchi Fried Rice

Koreans typically use short grain white rice for everyday use. However, any other rice you’d use for fried rice, including brown rice and mixed grain rice, is fine for this recipe as well.

As with any fried rice, day old rice is best to use, if available. The rice can get hard after being in the fridge. Heat it up in the microwave to soften it a little and break it up before stir-frying with kimchi.

You can, of course, make fresh rice for this dish. Simply use a little less water than the usual amount to make the rice slightly drier and cool before using.

 

How to Make Kimchi Fried Rice

The basic technique involves stir-frying the kimchi typically with some aromatic vegetables and seasonings until the kimchi turns soft and deep in color. This step brings out rich flavors of the kimchi.

If you’re using uncooked meat, cook the meat before stir-frying with the kimchi. It doesn’t need to be completely cooked through.  It’s much faster if you use cooked meat or canned tuna (drained). Simply throw it in while the kimchi is being stir-fried.

After adding the rice to the pan, stir constantly over medium low heat, breaking up the rice clumps, until everything is well incorporated. This will keep rice from sticking to the pan too much. Once the rice is evenly coated with the seasoning, turn up the heat high and stir only occasionally so the rice can get nicely toasted.

 

Tips for Making Good Kimchi Fried Rice

  • Whenever you cook with kimchi, it is best to use well-fermented kimchi for the rich and robust flavor it develops. No exception here.
  • If the leftover rice is hard after being in the fridge, heat it up in the microwave to soften it a little and break it up before stir-frying with the kimchi mix.
  • If you are using raw meat, season it with salt and pepper. A small amount of garlic and/or ginger to flavor the meat will be great too. Cook the meat before stir-frying with the kimchi.
  • To make it spicier, add gochugaru instead of more gochujang. Too much gochujang will make the dish too salty.
  • Use high heat to cook the kimchi, medium low heat while breaking up the rice clumps to keep the rice from sticking to the pan too much, and high heat to get the rice nicely toasted at the end.

 

Ingredients

  • 3 – 4 strips of bacon, diced (or about 4 ounces ham or spam, or 1 can of tuna, drained) See note 1 if using uncooked meat
  • 3/4 cup diced kimchi See note 2
  • 1/4 small onion, diced diced
  • 1 scallion, chopped chopped
  • 1 small carrot, finely chopped – optional
  • 3 – 4 tablespoons juice from kimchi
  • 1 tablespoon soy sauce
  • 1 tablespoon gochujang (Korean chili pepper paste) See note 3
  • 2-1/2 cups cooked rice See note 4
  • oil for stir-frying
  • 1/2 tablespoon sesame oil
  • salt and pepper to taste

 

Optional

  • 1 teaspoon sesame seeds
  • 2 eggs fried
  • 1 sheet roasted gim (dried seaweed sheet)

 

Instructions

  • If using meat, heat a lightly oiled large skillet over medium heat. Add the meat pieces. Cook until the meat is slightly browned. If you don’t want all the rendered fat, remove it from the pan and add a couple of tablespoons of cooking oil. If using ham, spam or canned tuna instead of meat, you can simply add it while stir-frying kimchi in step 2.

  • Add the onion and scallion and stir-fry quickly over high heat. Add the kimchi, optional carrots, juice from kimchi, soy sauce and gochujang. Stir fry until the kimchi turns soft and deep in color, 3 to 4 minutes. Take the time to do this step so the rich flavors develop.

  • Add the rice, and reduce the heat to medium low. Stir until everything is well incorporated and the clumped up rice is broken up, 3 to 4 minutes.

  • Once the rice is evenly coated with the seasoning, turn up the heat high and continue to fry the rice, turning occasionally. Add salt and pepper to taste. Mix in the sesame oil and the optional sesame seeds at the end.
  • Top with the optional fried egg, and garnish with the optional sesame seeds, gim (dried seaweed) strips and/or chopped scallion and serve.

 

Notes

  1. If you are using raw meat, season it with salt and pepper. A small amount of garlic and/or ginger to flavor the meat will be great too. Cook the meat before stir-frying with the kimchi.
  2. Whenever you cook with kimchi, it is best to use well-fermented kimchi for the rich and robust flavor it develops. No exception here.
  3. For spicier fried rice, add gochugaru instead of more gochujang. Too much gochujang will make the dish too salty.
  4. If the leftover rice is hard after being in the fridge, heat it up in the microwave to soften it a little and break it up before stir-frying with the kimchi mix.

 

 

How Drinking Water Can Rainproof Your Health – In Monsoon

Who doesn’t await monsoons? The pitter-patter instantly lights up the mood and makes us crave those deep fried pakodas and a cup of steaming adrak chai. While the best-loved rainy season is deeply enjoyed, it also brings along the possibility of falling prey to a host of airborne diseases, viral and bacterial infections, seasonal allergies and mosquito-borne ailments.

Our immune system is most vulnerable during the turn of seasons and bolstering it up via proper diet is the only way to put up a guard against the seasonal change.

Dietary tweaks can certainly go a long way in safeguarding your health this monsoon. Something as simple as your everyday drinking water can bring world of a difference. Ayurveda states down ways in which a person should drink water to reap maximum health benefits. Something as basic as plain drinking water and the way it is consumed can bring a lot of difference in the way our body functions.

Ayurveda expert from Baidyanath, Dr. Ashutosh Gautam brought to our notice the fact that most ailments during monsoon occur due to infected water. Water is also one of the

best carriers of infections. Also, “during monsoon our body’s constitution becomes more air dominated which can cause Vatta imbalance. Digestive issues are therefore pretty common around this time of the year and that is why fried foods should be consumed in moderation,” noted Dr. Ashutosh Gautam.

So how exactly water can help our health this monsoon? Take a look at the following points:

 

Clean Water

Even if you have access to clean drinking water, use purifying herbs to turn your drinking water into a natural detoxing agent. An herb called Nirmali can be added to your regular drinking water.

 

Bring out that Silverware

Drinking water stored in copper vessels or silverware has long been associated with good health. This should especially be put to practice during monsoon when the body could easily use some additional dose of minerals. Copper and silver vessels also add anti-bacterial properties to your drinking water.

 

 

Go Warm

Why You Should Start Your Day With a Glass of Warm Water - NDTV Food

Since digestive issues are usually on rise during monsoons, it is advisable to consume lukewarm throughout the day. Try ditching chilled water totally. Also, always have water after your meals and not just before or in-between meals. Consuming lukewarm water after meals promotes digestion.

 

 

The Add-Ons

It is always better to spike your drinking water with some neem leaves, tulsi and other anti-bacterial and immunity boosting ingredients like ginger.

 

 

Take a Sip

This is a rule you must abide by throughout the year. Water should always be consumed in sips, guzzling down half a bottle in just one go and then going without water for hours is not going to benefit your health. Ensure consuming at least 2 liters of water daily.