Food Archives - Jazz Discount Bazar

Kimchi Fried Rice

If you have some kimchi and rice, try this easy kimchi fried rice recipe! It’s so versatile that you can add any protein you like or omit it entirely. It’ll become one of your go-to easy meals.

Kimchi fried rice is a humble Korean dish made basically with kimchi and leftover rice. Since Korean homes almost always have these two staples, kimchi fried rice is a favorite go-to meal whenever there seems to be nothing to eat at home.

t’s especially popular among young people who are living on a low budget as it is a quick-fix meal, inexpensive to prepare, yet delicious and filling.

 

Kimchi Fried Rice 

If you have some kimchi and rice, try this easy kimchi fried rice recipe! It’s so versatile that you can add any protein you like or omit it entirely. It’ll become one of your go-to easy meals. 

 

Kimchi fried rice (kimchi bokkeumbap, 김치볶음밥) is a humble Korean dish made basically with kimchi and leftover rice. Since Korean homes almost always have these two staples, kimchi fried rice is a favorite go-to meal whenever there seems to be nothing to eat at home.

It’s especially popular among young people who are living on a low budget as it is a quick-fix meal, inexpensive to prepare, yet delicious and filling.

All you need is well fermented kimchi and some cooked rice! Kimchi has plenty of flavors, but it’s common to add some gochujang, soy sauce and/or gochugaru for more robust savory flavors and spiciness.

Popular protein additions by Koreans include processed meat, such as bacon, ham, sausage, or spam, as well as canned tuna. You can also cooked or uncooked chicken, pork, beef or shrimp, so feel free to experiment once you’ve got a hang of the basic technique.

For a vegan option, substitute the meat with tofu or omit it. Use vegan kimchi and skip the egg.

 

Rice for Kimchi Fried Rice

Koreans typically use short grain white rice for everyday use. However, any other rice you’d use for fried rice, including brown rice and mixed grain rice, is fine for this recipe as well.

As with any fried rice, day old rice is best to use, if available. The rice can get hard after being in the fridge. Heat it up in the microwave to soften it a little and break it up before stir-frying with kimchi.

You can, of course, make fresh rice for this dish. Simply use a little less water than the usual amount to make the rice slightly drier and cool before using.

 

How to Make Kimchi Fried Rice

The basic technique involves stir-frying the kimchi typically with some aromatic vegetables and seasonings until the kimchi turns soft and deep in color. This step brings out rich flavors of the kimchi.

If you’re using uncooked meat, cook the meat before stir-frying with the kimchi. It doesn’t need to be completely cooked through.  It’s much faster if you use cooked meat or canned tuna (drained). Simply throw it in while the kimchi is being stir-fried.

After adding the rice to the pan, stir constantly over medium low heat, breaking up the rice clumps, until everything is well incorporated. This will keep rice from sticking to the pan too much. Once the rice is evenly coated with the seasoning, turn up the heat high and stir only occasionally so the rice can get nicely toasted.

 

Tips for Making Good Kimchi Fried Rice

  • Whenever you cook with kimchi, it is best to use well-fermented kimchi for the rich and robust flavor it develops. No exception here.
  • If the leftover rice is hard after being in the fridge, heat it up in the microwave to soften it a little and break it up before stir-frying with the kimchi mix.
  • If you are using raw meat, season it with salt and pepper. A small amount of garlic and/or ginger to flavor the meat will be great too. Cook the meat before stir-frying with the kimchi.
  • To make it spicier, add gochugaru instead of more gochujang. Too much gochujang will make the dish too salty.
  • Use high heat to cook the kimchi, medium low heat while breaking up the rice clumps to keep the rice from sticking to the pan too much, and high heat to get the rice nicely toasted at the end.

 

Ingredients

  • 3 – 4 strips of bacon, diced (or about 4 ounces ham or spam, or 1 can of tuna, drained) See note 1 if using uncooked meat
  • 3/4 cup diced kimchi See note 2
  • 1/4 small onion, diced diced
  • 1 scallion, chopped chopped
  • 1 small carrot, finely chopped – optional
  • 3 – 4 tablespoons juice from kimchi
  • 1 tablespoon soy sauce
  • 1 tablespoon gochujang (Korean chili pepper paste) See note 3
  • 2-1/2 cups cooked rice See note 4
  • oil for stir-frying
  • 1/2 tablespoon sesame oil
  • salt and pepper to taste

 

Optional

  • 1 teaspoon sesame seeds
  • 2 eggs fried
  • 1 sheet roasted gim (dried seaweed sheet)

 

Instructions

  • If using meat, heat a lightly oiled large skillet over medium heat. Add the meat pieces. Cook until the meat is slightly browned. If you don’t want all the rendered fat, remove it from the pan and add a couple of tablespoons of cooking oil. If using ham, spam or canned tuna instead of meat, you can simply add it while stir-frying kimchi in step 2.

  • Add the onion and scallion and stir-fry quickly over high heat. Add the kimchi, optional carrots, juice from kimchi, soy sauce and gochujang. Stir fry until the kimchi turns soft and deep in color, 3 to 4 minutes. Take the time to do this step so the rich flavors develop.

  • Add the rice, and reduce the heat to medium low. Stir until everything is well incorporated and the clumped up rice is broken up, 3 to 4 minutes.

  • Once the rice is evenly coated with the seasoning, turn up the heat high and continue to fry the rice, turning occasionally. Add salt and pepper to taste. Mix in the sesame oil and the optional sesame seeds at the end.
  • Top with the optional fried egg, and garnish with the optional sesame seeds, gim (dried seaweed) strips and/or chopped scallion and serve.

 

Notes

  1. If you are using raw meat, season it with salt and pepper. A small amount of garlic and/or ginger to flavor the meat will be great too. Cook the meat before stir-frying with the kimchi.
  2. Whenever you cook with kimchi, it is best to use well-fermented kimchi for the rich and robust flavor it develops. No exception here.
  3. For spicier fried rice, add gochugaru instead of more gochujang. Too much gochujang will make the dish too salty.
  4. If the leftover rice is hard after being in the fridge, heat it up in the microwave to soften it a little and break it up before stir-frying with the kimchi mix.

 

 

Stay Healthy and Enjoy Rain

Avoid non-desirable health conditions in the pleasing moments of monsoon

 

Open up your windows to the pit-pat outside. Let the cool breeze gush in with the drizzle, Let it rain! Monsoons are a breath of fresh air, a moment of relief after a suffocating heatwave. For me, monsoon signifies the brightest hues, the fascinating aromas, and the eye-catching colors from big vibrant umbrellas to trendy flip-flops. Suddenly, the leaves look bright emerald green and the earth blows out a muddy aroma that fills up your senses. This fascinating weather gets you reaching out for that cup of garam chai and a steaming plate of fried pakoras. Cease right there! While the rain brings you a break from the scorching heat, it also brings with it a series of infections and occasional flu. It is really important to equip ourselves against these ailments to make the most of this lovely weather. So before you set foot in a café or a chai spot near your house, read through the list of foods you should avoid in the rainy season.

  1. Leafy Vegetables

It may seem counter-intuitive because all our lives we have been instructed about the importance of eating leafy vegetables. However, in the monsoon, they are best avoided. The grime and dampness present in them make them highly susceptible to germs. Say no to vegetables like spinach, cabbage, and cauliflower this season. Instead, go for pungent vegetables like bitter gourd, apple gourd, and sponge gourd. Make sure all vegetables are thoroughly washed and cooked well.

 

  1. Fresh Juices from Roadside Vendors

Any fresh food items that have had a long exposure to the monsoon air should be avoided. Roadside vendors have the fruits cut up well in advance, which could have come in contact with contaminated air. Stick to fresh fruit juice prepared at home and consume it instantly.

  1. Sea Food

Monsoon is the breeding season for fish and prawns so they are best avoided this time of the year. Stick to chicken and mutton to satiate your craving for non-vegetarian food. However, if it is essential to have seafood, make sure you only consume the freshest variety of it, taking extra care to cook them well.

  1. Fried Food

Yes, you read that right. Fried food is one of the food items you should avoid this rainy season and science backs me up on this too. The highly humid monsoon weather causes our digestion process to slow down. However irresistible that the spread of pakoras and samosas may seem, they could cause gastronomical complications like bloating and stomach upset. Extra salty food also causes water retention.

  1. Frizzy Drinks

Fizzy drinks reduce minerals in our body, which in turn leads to the reduction of enzyme activity. This is highly undesirable with an already weak digestive system. Keep a bottle of water or lemonade handy or stick to warm beverages like ginger tea. Your digestive system will thank you for it.

  1. Watery Foods

Buttermilk, lassi, rice, watermelon, etc. can cause swelling in the body. Avoiding such foods will take care of the water retention.

Nothing feels better than sitting by your window peacefully sipping a cup of tea, listening to your favorite song, the sight of drizzle, the calmness in the atmosphere, and that fresh earthy smell. This all can be enjoyed to the fullest only if you are fit and healthy and the immunity is at its peak. Be healthy and wise this monsoon.

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